A Million Miles in a Thousand Years.

Capture itEssentially, humans are alive for the purpose of journey, a kind of three-act structure. They are born and spend several years discovering themselves and the world, then plod through a long middle in which they are compelled to search for a mate reproduce and also create stability out of natural instability and then they find themselves at an ending that seems to be designed for reflection. At the end, their bodies are slower, they are not as easily distracted, they do less work, and they think and feel about a life lived rather than look forward to a life getting started. He didn’t know what the point of the journey was, but he did believe we were designed to search for and find something. And he wondered out loud if the point wasn’t the search but the transformation the search creates… I wondered that we were designed to live through something rather than to attain something, and the thing we were meant to live through was designed to change us.

The point of a story is the character arc, the change.

(…) I‘ve wondered, though, if one of the reasons we fail to acknowledge the brilliance of life is because we don’t want the responsibility inherent in the acknowledgement. We don’t want to be characters in a story because characters have to move and breathe and face conflict with courage. And if life isn’t remarkable, then we don’t have to do any of that; we can be unwilling victims instead of grateful participants.

A Million Miles in a Thousand Years. Donald Miller

Serendipity.

Lucky

Jonathan Trager, prominent television producer for ESPN, died last night from complications of losing his soul mate and his fiancee. He was 35 years old. Soft-spoken and obsessive, Trager never looked the part of a hopeless romantic. But, in the final days of his life, he revealed an unknown side of his psyche. This hidden quasi-Jungian persona surfaced during the Agatha Christie-like pursuit of his long reputed soul mate, a woman whom he only spent a few precious hours with. Sadly, the protracted search ended late Saturday night in complete and utter failure. Yet even in certain defeat, the courageous Trager secretly clung to the belief that life is not merely a series of meaningless accidents or coincidences. Uh-uh. But rather, its a tapestry of events that culminate in an exquisite, sublime plan. Asked about the loss of his dear friend, Dean Kansky, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author and executive editor of the New York Times, described Jonathan as a changed man in the last days of his life. “Things were clearer for him,” Kansky noted. Ultimately Jonathan concluded that if we are to live life in harmony with the universe, we must all possess a powerful faith in what the ancients used to call “fatum”, what we currently refer to as destiny.

Serendipity.

Inconsciencia.

 

¿Cuál es la definición de inconsciencia? Es hacer lo mismo una y otra vez y esperar un resultado distinto.
Según eso, la mayoría somos unos inconscientes, pero no lo somos al mismo tiempo, y sobre esa base, mantenemos la confianza. Pero esta forma de vida se convierte en algo sistémico, como el cáncer.
¿Puede perdurar este modo de vida si cada vez más y más gente es inconsciente al mismo tiempo?

-Wall Street

Atelier